Visitors with Alzheimer’s

Reflections: The Nasher Museum Alzheimer’s Program at Duke University began in 2014. As the museum states in its website, the program “provides engaging and interactive museum tours to visitors with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, their families, and their care partners. Reflections tours include guided discussions through the galleries, as well as live musical performances or hands-on art experiences. These special tours offer people who live with memory loss and their families the opportunity to enjoy art in the moment and to engage with the current exhibitions using multiple senses.”

What happened when the museum had to close because of the health crisis of COVID 19? Read about this in Colony Little’s June 1, 2020 article for Hyperallergic.

College art museums

This is from 2016…but it can start our discussion about the place of art museums on college campuses.

Jacoba Urist, “Why Do Colleges Have So Much Art?” The Atlantic, Nov. 1, 2016.

What is “relevant” in the 21st c.?

Two articles about how museums can make, and are making, exhibitions meaningful today.

“How art museums can remain relevant in the 21st century.” Alina Cohen, Artsy, June 15, 2018.

“The Mississippi Museum of Art Confronts the State’s Painful History”

The institution recently opened Picturing Mississippi, which presents a journey through the state’s charged history sprinkled with salient contemporary art.

Seph Rodney, Hyperallergic, June 18, 2018

Installation view of Picturing Mississippi, 1817–2017: Land of Plenty, Pain, and Promise at the Mississippi Museum of Art (all images by Julian Rankin and courtesy Mississippi Museum of Art unless otherwise noted)

Visual art for the visually impaired

The Capitoline Museum in Rome has several paintings by Caravaggio, a Baroque artist active in the city from around 1594 until shortly before his death in 1610. Caravaggio is known for his realism, earthy colors, and depiction of everyday scenes populated by characters one might encounter on the streets of Rome ca. 1600. The museum has developed a way to share these paintings with visually-impaired visitors through panels that “depict” the painting in raised relief. All visitors are invited to touch these panels to gain a better idea of Carvaggio’s painting which is, by definition, to be “seen.”

  

The painting here is an early work by Caravaggio, The Fortune Teller of ca. 1595.

What do you think of this? What other ways might art museums make their collections available to the visually impaired?

 

How do we get the public to visit?

Marcus Aurelius may seem esoteric to many Americans, but this late 2nd c. CE Roman emperor was a philosopher, and some scholars today consider his Meditations to be one of the most important texts from the ancient world.

Yes…this is interesting and important! But will it bring people to a museum?

The Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, one of Rome’s museums of ancient art, is located in one of the busiest sections of the city…right next to Rome’s main railroad station. Posters showing objects from the museum’s collection together with passages from Hadrian’s writings inform passersby what treasures lie within. Keep in mind…these are not ads but posters with objects from the museum’s collection and philosophical passages about life from Marcus Aurelius’s writings.

Do you think these are inviting? Do you think they bring visitors into the museum? Do you think the goal is to attract visitors, teach the public, something else?