More on the Benin Bronzes

A Benin sculpture is facing the auction block.

An Edo Bronze from the Kingdom of Benin, not dated, L. 16″

General information about the sale of this particular object can be found at Christie’s catalogue for this sale of art from Africa, Oceania, and North America.

This article by Erin Thompson gives you some context for the sale on June 29, 2020.

Follow-up June 30: The link to the catalogue does not work and this bronze does not appear among the objects in the sale.

Case Study: Returning works of cultural heritage to their homelands

How will this develop at the Quai Branly Museum in Paris? Read more in Fayah Nayeri’s New York Times article of June 5, 2020.

On the museum’s website you can link to a variety of tours to explore their collections.

You can also explore collections from places around the globe from the map.

Collecting COVID-19

What object(s) would you contribute to a museum to represents your experience of the COVID-19 pandemic? Read Adam Popescu’s article from the New York Times (May 25, 2020) to see what museums are collecting and the questions that arise from the act of collecting and deciding what is collected.

Ruben Natal-San Miguel’s “Toilet Paper Hoarder, Manhattan NYC” was submitted to the Museum of the City of New York‘s #CovidStoriesNYC project.
Credit: Ruben Natal-San Migue, via Museum of the City of New York
How Will We Remember the Pandemic? Museums Are Already Deciding

College art museums

This is from 2016…but it can start our discussion about the place of art museums on college campuses.

Jacoba Urist, “Why Do Colleges Have So Much Art?” The Atlantic, Nov. 1, 2016.

Canada: repatriating cultural heritage

“People Across the Globe Want Their Cultural Heritage Back. Canada May Offer a Blueprint for How to Get There”

“A proposed law would mobilize a national strategy to help Indigenous communities reclaim cultural heritage objects at home and abroad.”

A mask of the Kwakiutl, a native American clan on the West coast of Canada on display in the Humboldt Box museum in Berlin. Photo: JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images.

An additional article on the Cranmer Potlatch of 1921 from the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, June 8, 2018. That article closes with the following important questions:

Ask yourself:

Question 1:

What would you want to pass down to future generations?

Question 2:

What kind of cultural heritage is important to you and your community?

Question 3:

What role can museums play to help preserve and protect heritage?

 

Deaccessioning to add new works

The Baltimore Museum of Art (photo by Mike Steele, via Flickr)

Benjamin Sutton, “Baltimore Museum of Art Acquires 23 Major Works…” Hyperallergic, June 28, 2018.

Njideka Akunyili Crosby, “Dwell: Aso Ebi” (2017), the Baltimore Museum of Art, purchased as the gift of Nancy L. Dorman and Stanley Mazaroff, Baltimore, in Honor of Kristen Hileman (courtesy the Baltimore Museum of Art)

Announcement fro the BMA

And the earlier story:

Cara Our, “Artists and Curators Weigh in on Baltimore Museum’s Decision to Deaccession Works by White Men to Diversify its Collection.” Hyperallergic, May 8, 2018.

Acquisitions, repatriation, and popular culture

“These items are not for sale.”

“What Black Panther Gets Right About the Politics of Museums”

“In one scene, the blockbuster superhero movie touches on issues of provenance, repatriation, diversity, representation, and other debates currently shaping institutional practices.”  Lise Ragbir, Hyperallergic, March 20, 2018.

“Museums Should Consider Why They’ve Become Targets of Attack and Protest”

“A terror plot targeting the British Museum was recently thwarted, but the reasons why it became a target in the first place go far beyond the current political climate.” Erin L. Thompson, Hyperallergic, June 11, 2018.